The Future of Agriculture and Climate Change

The Future of Agriculture and Climate Change

All around the world, we see and feel the effects of climate change on our lives. While it impacts everyone, agriculture is one of the sectors that is at the forefront of climate change – contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and at the same time coping with growing our food under increasingly challenging conditions. So, how can we address climate change and take action that makes an impact? And what has research in Antarctica to do with it?

Thursday, February 3, 2022

In the third episode of Headlines of the Future, Jess Bunchek, plant scientist from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center and Dr. Klaus Kunz, sustainability and agriculture expert at Bayer discuss how climate change is inextricably linked with agriculture – and how it can be part of the solution. Jess and Klaus dive deep into their findings on the real effects on climate change and how it is altering the world we live in.

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